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many isssues

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  • #2610
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I have a whole mess of problems and cannot seem to resolve any of them. I have no idea how to fix them or what order they should be in. ANY help will be appreciated.

    I am running Version svn-1586 on a Alienware Laptop with Ubuntu Hardy Heron OS. My music is on a USB hdd that the OS does see and can play music from on the localhost, named “alienserver”. The filesystem labels that drive as /media/disk-1. All of my music is at /media/disk-1/music/itunes/itunes music. I have added /media/disk-1/music/itunes/itunes music AND /media/disk-1/music/itunes as paths under music folders in the .config file. I am trying to access the music from a Macbookpro. “Alienserver” is connected to the network via the router via CAT5e. the macbookpro is connected to my network via WEP enabled WiFi. I am able to SSH into “Alienserver” as well as view the web interface for Firefly from the macbook pro.

    Problems:

    1. Attempts to change anything on the config page of the web interface results in the following error “Error: 500general:xxxxx” where xxxx is the field I tried to change. I have been able to manually make changes to the config file by using the command: sudo nano /etc/mt-daapd.conf while SSH into the server.

    2. Two separate shares, both named “Firefly svn-1586 on alienserver” show up in my iTunes on my macbook pro but neither of them have any songs in them.

    3. Running “scan” or “full scan” from the web interface results in the scan performing a 5 second check and then going back to idle with zero songs found.

    my .config:

    Id: mt-daapd.conf.templ 1526 2007-04-09 04:23:51Z rpedde $
    #
    # This is the mt-daapd config file.
    #
    # If you have problems or questions with the format of this file,
    # direct your questions to [email protected].
    #
    # You can also check the website at http://mt-daapd.sourceforge.net,
    # as there is a growing documentation library there, peer-supported
    # forums and possibly more.
    #

    [general]

    #
    # web_root (required)
    #
    # Location of the admin web pages.
    #
    # If you installed from .RPM, .deb, or tarball with –prefix=/usr, then
    # this is correct.
    #
    # If you installed from tarball without –prefix=/usr, then the correct
    # path is probably /usr/local/share/mt-daapd/admin-root.
    #

    web_root = /usr/share/mt-daapd/admin-root

    #
    # port (required)
    #
    # What port to listen on. It is possible to use a different
    # port, but this is the default iTunes port
    #

    port = 3689

    #
    # admin_pw (required)
    #
    # This is the password to the administrative pages
    #

    admin_pw = mt-daapd

    #
    # db_type (required)
    #
    # This is what kind of backend database to store the song
    # info in. Valid choices are “sqlite” and “sqlite3”.
    #

    db_type = sqlite

    #
    # db_parms
    #
    # This is any extra information the db needs to connect.
    # in the case of sqlite and sqlite3, this is the name
    # of the directory to store the database in
    #
    # If you installed from RPM or .deb, this path likely already
    # exists. If not, then you must create it. The directory itself
    # must be writable by the “runas” user.
    #

    db_parms = /var/cache/mt-daapd

    #
    # mp3_dir (required)
    #
    # Location of the mp3 files to share. Note that because the
    # files are stored in the database by inode, these must be
    # in the same physical filesystem.
    #

    mp3_dir = /media/disk-1/music/itunes/itunes music,/media/disk-1/music/itunes

    #
    # servername (required)
    #
    # This is both the name of the server as advertised
    # via rendezvous, and the name of the database
    # exported via DAAP. Also know as “What shows up in iTunes”.
    #

    servername = Firefly %v on %h

    #
    # runas (required)
    #
    # This is the user to drop privs to if running as
    # root. If mt-daapd is not started as root, this
    # configuration option is ignored. Notice that this
    # must be specified whether the server is running
    # as root or not.
    #
    # This is also ignored on Windows.
    #

    runas = nobody

    #
    # playlist (optional)
    #
    # This is the location of a playlist file.
    # This is for Apple-style “Smart Playlists”
    # See the mt-daapd.playlist file in the
    # contrib directory for syntax and examples
    #
    # This doesn’t control static playlists… these
    # are controlled with the “process_m3u” directive
    # below.
    #

    playlist = /usr/etc/mt-daapd.playlist

    #
    # password (optional)
    #
    # This is the password required to listen to MP3 files
    # i.e. the password that iTunes prompts for
    #

    #password = mp3

    #
    # extensions (optional)
    #
    # These are the file extensions that the daap server will
    # try to index and serve. By default, it only indexes and
    # serves .mp3 files. It can also server .m4a and .m4p files,
    # and just about any other files, really. Unfortunately, while
    # it can *attempt* to serve other files (.ogg?), iTunes won’t
    # play them. Perhaps this would be useful on Linux with
    # Rhythmbox, once it understands daap. (hurry up!)
    #
    # Failing that, one can use server-side conversion to transcode
    # non-standard (.ogg, .flac) music to wav on the server side.
    # See the ssc_* options below.
    #
    # To be able to index .ogg files, you’ll need to have configured
    # with –enable-oggvorbis. For .flac, –enable-flac, for .mpc,
    # –enable-musepack.
    #

    extensions = .mp3,.m4a,.m4p

    #
    # ssc_codectypes (optional)
    #
    # List of codectypes for files that the daap server should
    # perform internal format conversion and present to clients
    # as WAV files. The file extensions that these codectypes correspond
    # to must also be present in ‘extensions’
    # configuration value, or files are not probed in the first
    # place.
    #
    # Valid codectypes:
    #
    # mp4a – for AAC (.aac, .mp4, .m4a, .m4p)
    # mpeg – for mp3
    # wav – for wav
    # wma – for wma
    # ogg – for ogg
    # flac – for flac (.flac, .fla)
    # mpc for musepack (.mpc, .mpp, .mp+)
    # alac for alac (.m4a)
    #

    ssc_codectypes = ogg,flac,alac

    # These are the file extensions that the daap server will
    # try to index and serve. By default, it only indexes and
    # serves .mp3 files. It can also server .m4a and .m4p files,
    # and just about any other files, really. Unfortunately, while
    # it can *attempt* to serve other files (.ogg?), iTunes won’t
    # play them. Perhaps this would be useful on Linux with
    # Rhythmbox, once it understands daap. (hurry up!)
    #
    # Failing that, one can use server-side conversion to transcode
    # non-standard (.ogg, .flac) music to wav on the server side.
    # See the ssc_* options below.
    #
    # To be able to index .ogg files, you’ll need to have configured
    # with –enable-oggvorbis. For .flac, –enable-flac, for .mpc,
    # –enable-musepack.
    #

    extensions = .mp3,.m4a,.m4p

    #
    # ssc_codectypes (optional)
    #
    # List of codectypes for files that the daap server should
    # perform internal format conversion and present to clients
    # as WAV files. The file extensions that these codectypes correspond
    # to must also be present in ‘extensions’
    # configuration value, or files are not probed in the first
    # place.
    #
    # Valid codectypes:
    #
    # mp4a – for AAC (.aac, .mp4, .m4a, .m4p)
    # mpeg – for mp3
    # wav – for wav
    # wma – for wma
    # ogg – for ogg
    # flac – for flac (.flac, .fla)
    # mpc for musepack (.mpc, .mpp, .mp+)
    # alac for alac (.m4a)
    #

    ssc_codectypes = ogg,flac,alac
    # extensions (optional)
    #

    #
    # ssc_prog (optional)
    #
    # Program that is used in server side format conversion.
    # Program must accept following command line syntax:
    # ssc_prog filename offset length …
    # Parameter filename is the real name of the file that is
    # to be converted and streamed, offset is number of bytes
    # that are skipped from the beginning of the _output_ file
    # before streaming is started, length is length of the song
    # in seconds (or zero). All other possible arguments must
    # be ignored. The resulting wav file (or the rest of
    # the file after initial seek) is written to the standard
    # output by the ssc_prog program. This is typically
    # a script that is a front end for different conversion tools
    # handling different formats.
    #

    ssc_prog = /usr/bin/mt-daapd-ssc.sh

    #
    # logfile (optional)
    #
    # This is the file to log to. If this is not configured,
    # then it will log to the syslog.
    #
    # Not that the -d switch will control the log verbosity.
    # By default, it runs at log level 1. Log level 9 will churn
    # out scads of useless debugging information. Values in between
    # will vary the amount of logging you get.
    #

    #logfile = /var/log/mt-daapd.log

    #
    # rescan_interval
    #
    # How often to check the file system to see if any mp3 files
    # have been added or removed.
    #
    # if not specified, the default is 0, which disables background scanning.
    #
    # If background rescanning is disabled, a scan can still be forced from the
    # “status” page of the administrative web interface
    #
    # Setting a rescan_interval lower than the time it takes to rescan
    # won’t hurt anything, it will just waste CPU, and make connect times
    # to the daap server longer.
    #
    #

    #rescan_interval = 300

    # always_scan
    #
    # The default behavior is not not do background rescans of the
    # filesystem unless there are clients connected. The thought is to
    # allow the drives to spin down unless they are in use. This might be
    # of more importance in IDE drives that aren’t designed to be run
    # 24×7. Forcing a scan through the web interface will always work
    # though, even if no users are connected.

    # always_scan = 0

    #
    # process_m3u
    #
    # By default m3u processing is turned off, since most m3u files
    # sitting around in peoples mp3 directories have bad paths, and
    # I hear about it. 🙂
    #
    # If you are sure your m3u files have good paths (i.e. unixly pathed,
    # with relative paths relative to the directory the m3u is in), then
    # you can turn on m3u processing by setting this directive to 1.
    #
    # I’m not sure “unixly” is a word, but you get the idea.
    #

    # process_m3u = 0

    #
    # scan_type
    #
    #
    # This sets how aggressively mp3 files should be scanned to determine
    # file length. There are three values:
    #

    # 0 (Normal)
    # Just scan the first mp3 frame to try and calculate size. This will
    # be accurate for most files, but VBR files without an Xing tag will
    # probably have wildly inaccurate file times. This is the default.
    #
    # 1 (Aggressive)
    # This checks the bitrates of 10 frames in the middle of the song.
    # This will still be inaccurate for VBR files without an Xing tag,
    # but they probably won’t be quite as inaccurate as 0. This takes
    # more time, obviously, although the time hit will only happen the
    # first time you scan a particular file.
    #
    # 2 (Painfully aggressive)
    # This walks through the entire song, counting the number of frames.
    # This should result in accurate song times, but will take the most
    # time. Again, this will only have to be incurred the first time
    # the file is indexed.
    #

    scan_type = 0

    #
    # compress
    #
    # Whether to use gzip content-encoding when transferring playlists etc.
    # This was contributed as a patch by Ciamac Moallemi just prior to the 0.2.1
    # release, and as such, hasn’t gotten as much testing as other features.
    #
    # This feature should substantially speed up transfers of large databases
    # and playlists.
    #
    # It will eventually default to 1, but currently it defaults to 0.
    #

    #compress = 0

    [plugins]
    plugin_dir = /usr/share/mt-daapd/plugins

    Again, any help would be great!

    #17650
    stretch
    Participant

    Rule #1: If Firefly is not working check access permissions.
    Rule #2: If it’s still not working, check permissions again 😀

    Firefly runs as nobody/nobody on *nix systems. This means that permissions for owner/group/others needs to be set to rw-r–r–

    Problem 1: Sound like the web interface doesn’t have write access to the config file
    Problem 2: The “no songs” is because Firefly probably doesn’t have read access to where the music is stored
    Problem 3: confirms that Firefly doesn’t have read access to the music library

    Don’t know about two instances showing up

    #17651
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    thanks for the tips stretch. I worked some of the issues after taking your advice to check permissions.

    Highlights:

    -tried to change permissons on the USB HDD using chmod only to find that since it is FAT32 I could not change the permissions

    -tried to change “runas = nobody” to reflect the owner of the files on the hdd with the music. This caused firefly to freeze.

    -reformatted another USB HDD to ext3 and moved some music there. then pointed Firefly to that path. AND *POOF* it worked!

    -verified the permissions on the .config file were rwxrwxrwx and discovered that although the web interface returns an error, changes are in fact written to the .config file.

    I am still having trouble with iTunes displaying two shares. Same name, same songs. I am able to access the shared music from both a mac and a pc running iTunes so i will live with that bug for now. I’d still like to fix that so help with that would be appreciated.

    #17652
    EVILRipper
    Participant

    If the usb hdd was mounted in fat32 (vfat) try checking your /etc/fstab or mount options. It is possible to mount a fat32 device with certain rights.
    I believe it was something similar to umount=022 or umask=022.

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