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ID3v1 tags?

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  • #1088
    EVILRipper
    Participant

    Hello,

    I’m running Firefly Version svn-1450 on a linux box.
    I wrote some app to request the songs from a domain, and dump them in a m3u playlist. (using Winamp)
    This all works perfectly, but when i play a song, some songs’ name change to for example: “2587.mp3?session-id=14&revision-id=2”.
    Some songs work perfectly, loading the tags when streaming.
    When i compared these files, i noticed the ones -not- loading the tags have ID3v1 tags.
    The ones that -did- load the tags have ID3v2 tags.
    Oh btw, when I stream songs local, ID3v1 tags -do- work.
    Just streaming from remote (school) only the ID3v2 tags seem to work.

    Are these supported? Or how do i fix this?

    Thanks in advance.

    ~EVILRipper

    #9079
    CCRDude
    Participant

    Maybe you should mention what kind of client you’re using to listen?
    If you’re listening with WinAmp as it seems, you probably should ask if WinAmp supports those… hmmm… or actually not, since it seems to be part of the standard:

    ID3v1 tags are at the very end of the file (have to be), while ID3v2 tags usually are at the beginning (they can be in different places, but nearly every tagger stores them at the beginning). So if you’ve only got ID3v1 tags and stream (playing live instead of downloading then playing), that means the ID3v1 tag will arrive when the song is finished playing…

    #9080
    EVILRipper
    Participant

    Heya,

    Thanks for the info! I didn’t know that. That would indeed explain why the ID3v1 tags didnt show up. Anyway, i googled and found some easy linux command to find all mp3 files and convert them to ID3v2, so problems solved. Thanks anyway!

    ~EVILRipper

    #9081
    everdred
    Guest

    @EVILRipper wrote:

    Heya,
    Anyway, i googled and found some easy linux command to find all mp3 files and convert them to ID3v2
    ~EVILRipper

    Out of curiosity, what command is that?

    #9082
    EVILRipper
    Participant

    @everdred wrote:

    @EVILRipper wrote:

    Heya,
    Anyway, i googled and found some easy linux command to find all mp3 files and convert them to ID3v2
    ~EVILRipper

    Out of curiosity, what command is that?

    It uses a simple program called ‘id3v2’.
    Since im using Debian, all I had to do was ‘apt-get install id3v2’ and run the command:

    find -name *.[Mm][Pp]3 -exec id3v2 -C '{}' ;

    This command recursively converts all id3v1 tags to id3v2.
    Worked like a charm for me. 🙂

    #9083
    kellyharding
    Participant

    @EVILRipper wrote:

    It uses a simple program called ‘id3v2’.
    Since im using Debian, all I had to do was ‘apt-get install id3v2’ and run the command:

    find -name *.[Mm][Pp]3 -exec id3v2 -C '{}' ;

    This command recursively converts all id3v1 tags to id3v2.
    Worked like a charm for me. 🙂

    Do you mind if I add this to the wiki?

    Kelly

    #9084
    EVILRipper
    Participant

    Heh, go right ahead. 🙂

    #9085
    gmd
    Participant

    There should be a starting directory for your find command. You also may have problems with songs or paths that have have spaces in them. I’d recommend:

    find /path/to/mp3s -iname "*.mp3" -print0 | xargs -0 id3v2 -C

    Using xargs vs exec will speed up the execution of the task.

    #9086
    kellyharding
    Participant

    Added this to the wiki.

    Kelly

    #9087
    beef_doughnut
    Participant

    Be warned that this messed up a lot of files for me. In many cases the track name was wiped from the file, sometimes the artist, album, and track name were all wiped out. I was able to reverse the damage after a few hours with a mass tagger (luckily the filenames had enough for me to restore most tracks), but I still wouldn’t recommend this procedure.

    #9088
    rpedde
    Participant

    @beef_doughnut wrote:

    Be warned that this messed up a lot of files for me. In many cases the track name was wiped from the file, sometimes the artist, album, and track name were all wiped out. I was able to reverse the damage after a few hours with a mass tagger (luckily the filenames had enough for me to restore most tracks), but I still wouldn’t recommend this procedure.

    That’s true. If you don’t have id3v1 tags, or your id3v1 tags are wrong or empty, that will indeed propogate bad data to the id3v2 tags.

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